Celsius, Centigrade and Fahrenheit

What is the difference between Celsius, Centigrade and Fahrenheit?

 

What is Celsius?

°C

  • This is the most common temperature scale in the world and the simplest to understand.
  • Put simply, 0°C is the freezing point of water and 100°C is the boiling point of water.
  • Centigrade is an old fashioned name for Celsius.
  • You can abbreviate it to °C.
  • The scale is named after Swedish scientist Anders Celsius (1701-1744).

 

What is Fahrenheit?

°F

  • Fahrenheit is still in everyday use in the USA and preferred by older people in the UK.
  • In Fahrenheit the freezing point of water is 32°F and the boiling point is 212°F.
  • You can abbreviate it to °F.
  • The scale is named after its originator Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686-1736).

 

So what was Centigrade?

  • Centigrade is the old fashioned name for Celsius.
  • The name Centigrade was derived from the latin - meaning hundred degrees.
  • When Anders Celsius created his original scale in 1742 he inexplicably chose 0° for the boiling point and 100° for the freezing point.
  • One year later Frenchman Jean Pierre Cristin proposed an inverted version of the scale (freezing point 0°, boiling point 100°). He named it Centigrade.
  • In 1948, by international agreement, Cristin's adapted scale became known as Celsius to honour the Swedish Scientist.

 

What is the difference between them?

  • Celsius, Centigrade & Fahrenheit are all temperature scales.
  • All temperatures can be expressed in Celsius or Fahrenheit.
  • Both scales have the same value at -40°: -40°C = -40°F
  • To convert between Celsius or Fahrenheit you can use the following equations:

 

°C = °F - 32 x (5/9)

°F = °C / (5/9) + 32

 

 

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